Behind the Track

Behind the Track: Jack Rua & LOGUOS

1st August 2019

Tags:

Was there anything that inspired you when writing ‘Ego’?

I was going through a period of change when I wrote ‘Ego’. I had kind of shed the last of my early adult self-consciousness, and was beginning to believe in myself as a person and as an artist. I started to express that newfound appreciation for myself outwardly and I found that some people in my life didn’t really understand it; namely someone I was dating at the time who seemed to believe that I was too “egotistical” to ever love somebody else.

So, this song is my way of saying that even if I’m in love, I’m never going to stop loving myself and expressing that love, because when it comes down to it, I’m the only person who I’m ever going to always wake up with in the morning.

How did you approach the songwriting process?

Well, ‘Ego’ is a co-write with a Dublin based electronic artist, LOGUOS. I met him through Instagram and we decided to start working together. Initially, he sent me a beat which is almost entirely comprised of the chord progression heard in the verses. I wrote a melody plus a few lyrics and laid out my ideas, then we met up in person and pretty much wrote the entire song in a couple of hours.

Personally, I have been following a technique outlined in the book “The Artist’s Way” for a few years now, where every morning you write three pages of freehand journal, and before beginning to write the song with LOGUOS, I used this as a method of developing the concept that I was trying to convey.

Do you have a favourite line/section of the track?

My favourite lyric in the song is “Listen to me when I say ‘I’m a fool for your love’, but your body’s not the only one I feel when our clothes come off”. One thing I try to do in songwriting is say things that may come across as bold or obnoxious, but that with further observation make more sense.

For example in my previous single ‘Scarlet A’, I openly discussed my temptation to cheat on a partner, but by the end of the song I come to the conclusion that this is a natural human trait and it’s nothing to be ashamed of, as long as you don’t act on it. With this line in ‘Ego’, I say something that upon first listen may be perceived as being selfish or self-centred, but in the context of the song makes perfect sense.

I want to love and feel myself as much as I ever love and feel the person who I’m making love to. And why shouldn’t we all want that!

Can you describe your sound in three words?

I said “Artificial authentic pop” in my previous BIMM blog feature, so let me try and think of something equally conceptual and mysterious…. Let’s say… “Glam Pop Simulation”.

How do you feel your sound has developed since studying at BIMM?

Well, when I was at BIMM I was writing mostly glam rock music that was inspired by theatre and pop. Then in 2017, I moved to New York City, where I immersed myself in the music, art, drag and burlesque scene. I kind of switched off the part of me that was an “artist”, and let the new experiences and influences fill that space. Then when I moved home and started making music with a view to it being an art form that I was going to publicise, I allowed those new experiences and influences to inform me, and to mix with the training and development that I received in BIMM. I think it’s interesting to note now that I make electro pop music, but if you analyse it you can still hear the rock stylings that I developed at BIMM.

Do you have a stand out moment from your time at BIMM?

Getting on the Live & Lyrical gig for the first time was an amazing feeling! I was in second year when I got picked, so I had already gone through a year and a half of rejections, and being picked to perform really gave me a lot of confidence and showed me that the vision that I was working towards was something worth pursuing.

Facebook // Instagram // Twitter

Author

Sarah-Louise Burns

After studying Ba(Hons) Photography, Sarah has worked in Social Media Marketing since 2013 - she's now part of the BIMM Social Media Team, and is photographer for the Who, What, Why series.