Behind the Track

Behind the Track: Aoife Carton

18th July 2017

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What was the inspiration behind your track?

I love the use of metaphors in lyrics. The nursery rhyme Jack and Jill had been playing on my mind, in the sense that I wondered about the last line – whether Jill had been trying to save Jack when she tumbled. This resonated with me, touching on the feeling of being so infatuated with someone that you will do anything for them, even when it involves being hurt yourself. Often, you don’t realise how damaging it is until much later. The concept of my song Jack & Jill, is discussing who is to blame; the person who is hurting the other, or the person who allows themselves to be hurt.

What did your process involve?

I wrote a lot of verses for this song, aware that a lot of songwriters use nursery rhymes and determined to make sure my take on it came across. I’ve found from rehearsals and listening to people’s feedback, that listeners have different takes on what the chorus of the song is – it’s definitely a lyric-based song and so I wasn’t worried too much about this. The melody came pretty quickly, I wanted it to sound like I was telling a story. It was whilst recording that Sean Behan, who produced it, perfectly captured the nursery rhyme element with its upbeat arrangement.

Is there a specific line that stands out in the song, and why?

My favourite line is, ‘Jack he hid his pain, behind the burden of his name, for causing such sorrow’. Again, playing on the nursery rhyme, hinting that Jack is almost infamous for falling down the hill, it highlights this character’s vulnerabilities and reiterates the question of who is to blame, when both characters are in fact suffering (a little darker look at a nursery rhyme).

Can you describe your sound in three words?

Country influenced folk.

What’s the best thing about studying at BIMM?

There is so much I love about BIMM but its constant competitive but supportive environment has pushed me so much this year. Competitive in the sense that it’s impossible to sit around whilst watching other students work and push their music and so it motivates you to be constantly pro-active. Supportive, because then when you go to write, or record, or gig, you have a sea of musicians to play with and tutors to guide you in the right direction.

Author

Sarah-Louise Burns

After studying Ba(Hons) Photography, Sarah has worked in Social Media Marketing since 2013 - she's now part of the BIMM Social Media Team, and is photographer for the Who, What, Why series.